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In Press: Defining and Measuring the Influences of GIS-Based Instruction on Students’ STEM-Relevant Reasoning

Jant, E. A., Uttal, D. H., Kolvoord, R., James, K., & Msall, C. (in press). Defining and Measuring the Influences of GIS-Based Instruction on Students’ STEM-Relevant Reasoning, Journal of Geography.

Erin Jant, professor at Birmingham University and former graduate student of Catherine Haden, SILC Advisory Board Member,  has a paper in press with the Journal of Geography titled  Defining and Measuring the Influences of GIS-Based Instruction on Students’ STEM-Relevant Reasoning. The paper analyzes how GIS instruction in classrooms influence STEM-relevant reasoning. The team of researchers have defined what STEM-relevant reasoning is in this context and how to measure STEM-relevant reasoning in students who have been given GIS-based instruction in the classroom.

GIS is used as part of The Chicago Geospatial Semester (GSS) project, showcased on NSF’s STEM for All 2019 video hall highlighting “innovation in STEM education”. Chicago GSS builds on the Geospatial Semester (GSS) program, originally offered to high school students in Virginia, which uses geospatial technologies to teach students how to apply GIS and other technologies to real world problems. In the STEM for All project statement, Katie James said, “Our goal is to examine whether, and how, the GSS can be adapted to meet the needs of large, urban school districts teaching a variety of content areas. This project focuses on groups currently underrepresented in STEM occupations with the goal of infusing GIS and spatial thinking as a STEM practice into the career pathways that these students are already pursuing” (2019, May). The upcoming paper by Jant et al. will shed insight into how researchers can measure STEM-relevant reasoning as part of the GIS instruction offered in the GSS and Chicago GSS programs.